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A Guide To Free Internet Genealogy Research

    Hello!, And welcome to my web page. This web site was designed to aquaint you with free genealogy research on the internet. The first thing you should do is gather together all of the information at your disposal, photographs, certificates,( birth, marriage, death, DD-214 honorable discharge, etc.) newspaper articles, and family oral traditions. Next start your basic family tree and include all of the information you have, including notations, (such as hobbies, family traditional stories, etc.) locations, and dates. Next, download a free family tree / research software from the internet, such as Legacy 4.0 at

  • http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/; this is an excellant family tree maker with lots of room for notations, photographs, etc. Transfer all of your notes and photos to Legacy.
        Now, to start your research; you can begin either at your local public library, the local hall of records, or the internet. The hall of records will charge you $12.00 per copy of certificate. The other sources can be freely researched. Your first search should be at
  • http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/, offered by the Mormon Church, this is not only free, but an excellant starting point of your investigation into your heritage. Next, you might want to try
  • http://www.ancestry.com/,
  • http://www.genealogy.com/allsearch.html, and
  • http://searches.rootsweb.com/, these offer a search engine for names as well as a bulletin board for posting an inquiry about an ancester or family ; I have received many hits from these sources.
        You should also search for your family coat of arms at
  • http://digiserve.com/heraldry/, although not free, James Wolf heraldry is one of the oldest and best coat of arms research sites. Other, non-orthodox sources of information include
  • http://www.getty.edu/research/conducting_research/vocabularies/tgn/, which is a search engine for geographic location names, such as "Shrum Lake", "Shrum Creek", "Dark Shrum Branch", "Shrum Resevoir" etc. You can see that if a family has been around awhile, and has had an influence on their neighbors and surroundings, places are often named after them.
        You might also try searching
  • http://www.yahoo.com/,
  • http://www.dogpile.com/, or
  • http://www.google.com/, etc.    for your family name, you never know what you might find; such as "Shrum", a song by Floyd Cramer. Google also has the ability to search the internet for photographs.
        If you are searching, like myself, for Indian heritage in your family tree, the search gets much more difficult. Your ancester must be listed on the Dawes Rolls in order to be listed on the tribal rolls. If you cannot find your ancester listed on the Dawes Rolls, you must just accept the fact that you know you are from Indian blood, but can never be officially recognized by either the tribe or the government as such. Many Indian people of the 19th century were trying to fit in with the white nation and changed their tribal names to white names, changed their Indian culture for white culture, and refused to sign the rolls; in fact, less than one third of the Indian nation were listed on the rolls. You can search the rolls at:
  • http://members.aol.com/bbbenge/front.html

        Military records are also an excellant sorce of information( especially include notes on their battles if available); such as Pleasant Franklin Shrum, who enlisted as a private, company I, 9th Kentucky Infantry, C.S.A. on October 25th, 1861 in Columbia, Kentucky. He was discharged on November 15th, 1864 at Louisville, Kentucky, after the end of the Civil War. He returned home to find that his wife had died during childbirth, and that his son had died during birth as well. You can search military records at:
  • http://home.att.net/~wee-monster/military.html
      
        Ship's logs from the Old World are also an excellant source of information; such as the log from the "Davy" which sailed from Rotterdam, Holland for America, and landed in Penn. on Oct. 25, 1738. The ship's carpenter, William Patton had to bring the ravaged vessel into port, having lost the captain, both mates, and 160 passengers at sea. Among the survivors, (Johann) Jacob Schramm ( later Americanized into Shrum) and his two surviving sons were among the 40 men who were well enough to take the oath of allegience. (This year: 1738, had been so devastating to the German immigrants, that they called it "The Year Of The Destroying Angels"; a reference to Psalms 78, verse 49: "He let loose on them his fierce anger, wrath, indignation, and distress; a company of destroying angels." See    
  • http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~marier/Germanna.htm
       for more information). You can search ship passenger logs at:
  • http://www.rootsweb.com/~fianna/oc/usa/narasl.html

        Lastly, develop a web page and publish your family tree; the more people that know about your research, the better the chance for information to come to you. You should really learn xhmtl and develop your own web page from code, like this one; it's not as hard as it looks, and this being my first effort, I think it looks better than what a "wysiwyg" editor can build. You can visit:
  • http://webdesign.about.com/c/ec/9.htm , to learn how to make your own web page.
       Remember, though, the genealogy information you receive from the net is only as accurate as the person who posted it. Always make notations of your sources for future reference, and if in doubt, double check the source information from different areas.
        Good luck with your search;
        Mel Shrum
           
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